Category: Open science skills

First meeting of National Research Data & Software training coordination

Picture credit: Carlos Teijeiro Barjas

Paula Martinez Lavanchy, the Research Data officer coordinating RDM training initiatives at TU Delft and 4TU.ResearchData co-organized the ‘First meeting of National Research Data & Software training coordination’ together with Mateusz Kuzak from the Netherlands eScienceCenter and Carlos Teijeiro Barjas from SURFsara.

This is her report about the event that took place on 3 March 2020 at SURF in Utrecht.

How did this initiative start?

In October 2019, TU Delft published its Vision for Research Data and Software Management Training. This ambitious plan aims at covering the different training needs that we consider relevant for researchers (including PhD candidates) at different stages of their research. This is a live document that needs constant evaluation and adjustment. So, since its publication, my task as the coordinator of RDM training activities has been to implement this vision and to investigate the challenges that can be encountered and possible solutions.

One of the first evident challenges is, how can we ensure that we are able to provide all the training we think is relevant for researchers in a sustainable way? 

At the end of 2019, in a meeting with Mateusz Kuzak from the Netherlands eScienceCenter and Carlos Teijeiro from SURFsara, we discussed all our ideas for developing and organizing training at our respective institutions and already found some ways to collaborate. But, we also thought that the sustainability issue of RDM (including software) training is probably common at different institutions and that there are other challenges that we could be solving collaboratively within the training coordinators community. So, we decided to go national!

What was the meeting about?

We contacted everybody that we knew was involved in providing or coordinating training in the field of Research Data and Software skills at the Dutch Universities and other organizations and call for a meeting to:

  1. Network and exchange knowledge about the training activities at different research institutions around the Netherlands
  2. Identify the challenges and the needs for training
  3. Identify collaboration opportunities

The session took place on 3 March 2020 and 18 participants (including us – the three hosts) from 12 institutions joined for a whole afternoon to discuss training.

Here you can see the introduction slides of the meeting: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3712254

We initiated the session with 5 min pitches from each institution to know what type of training is in place. After that, we collected challenges encountered in RDM-generic training, Software-related training and Discipline-specific training.

This first part of the discussion provided useful information about the different approaches towards training for RDM-related topics. Sometimes training on RDM is provided under a broad topic like Research Reproducibility or Open Science, and sometimes it is split to focus on specific RDM-related tasks such as Data Management Planning or Data Publication. 

At this point, I already identified with whom I should be exchanging experiences more in-depth about similar courses organized at TU Delft. It is in my to-do list to discuss with colleagues from the Centre for Digital Scholarship Leiden if and how to join forces to provide Data Carpentries for Social Sciences, which demonstrated to be very relevant for researchers at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. I am also hoping to exchange knowledge with colleagues from VU Amsterdam about their approach to training on versioning control (training on Git). And, I could also get some more colleagues engaged in participating in our Code Refinery Train-the-Trainer event planned after the summer. 

When discussing challenges, it was easy to identify commonalities such as lack of trainers and helpers for the training sessions, the low motivation of researchers to attend the generic RDM courses if they are not mandatory, the lack of practical exercises and applied material, or the the lack of awareness about innovative ways to provide RDM training. 

Then, the most exciting part came: Is there room for collaboration to approach the challenges? Are we interested in collaborating? If yes, how can we collaborate? 

A collaborative future

In the last part of the meeting, we brainstormed about ideas to work collaboratively on training. Everybody agreed that there is a lot of potential to work we could collaborate on in different areas.

Some example of collaborative efforts that were mentioned:

  • National pool of trainers for domain-specific, data type-specific and/or software to exchange between institutions.
  • Database of trainers profiles – in case institutions want to hire trainers or facilitate the exchange of trainers within institutions.
  • Coordination of The Carpentries efforts – having a national coordinator of The Carpentries (or training in general) that can support people in creating a community around training, certifying instructors, and the development of training materials.
  • Exchange of course materials from the different institutions in The Netherlands – focus on making them FAIR, exchange course description, modules, visual material and exercises (especially practical exercises).
  • Training in developing open training materials in  a collaborative manner (using The Carpentries framework)
  • Train-the-Trainers programme – support staff providing training needs pedagogical skills and to learn creative ways of providing the content/exercises. In addition, there is also a need to learn about tools that researchers use for RDM in order to be able to teach about them. 

What’s next?

In the next few weeks, we need to identify if some of these ideas could be organized within established initiatives already existing in the Netherlands e.g. LCRDM, NPOS, RDNL, etc. It is also necessary to discuss how the resources can be organized to continue the coordination of the Research Data & Software training at a national level. 

The ideas will be shared with the initial group we contacted and we can decide as a community the best way to move forward.

If you coordinate Research Data and Software training at your institution and you are interested to join this network, please contact Paula Martinez Lavanchy, Mateusz Kuzak or Carlos Teijeiro

Reflections on Research Assessment for Researcher Recruitment and Career Progression – talking while acting?

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Written by: Marta Teperek, Maria Cruz, Alastair Dunning

On 14 May 2019, we (Marta Teperek & Alastair Dunning from TU Delft, and Maria Cruz from VU Amsterdam) attended the “2019 workshop on Research Assessment in the Transition to Open Science”, organised in Brussels by the European University Association. The event accompanied the launch of the Joint Statement by the European University Association and Science Europe to Improve Scholarly Research Assessment Methodologies.

During the day we had a full agenda of valuable presentations and discussions on the topic of research assessment. Colleagues from several European universities presented case studies about current efforts at their institutions. All the presentations are available on the event’s website. Therefore, in this blog post, we don’t discuss individual talks and statements but offer some wider reflections.

Extreme pressure is not conducive to quality research

The first notion, repeated by several presenters and participants, was that the extreme work pressure contemporary academics face is not conducive to high-quality research. To succeed under the current rewards and incentives system, focusing on finding answers to explain natural phenomena through series of questions and testing and following the principles of scientific methodology, as 19th century scientists did, is not enough; 21st century researchers need instead to concentrate on publishing as many papers as possible, in certain journals, and on securing as many grants as possible.

Such pressure, the panellists at the event continued, limits the time available for creative thinking; selects for work that advances career progression to the detriment of work that benefits society and truly advances scholarly knowledge; and drives out young researchers, with adverse effects on the equality and diversity in science.

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Figure showed by Eva Mendez during her presentation comparing a 19th century scientist with a 21st century academic. Source: https://www.euroscientist.com/?s=current+reward+system

You do not need to be a superhero – the importance of Team Science

Extreme work pressure has multiple causes. One significant factor is that academics are currently required to excel at everything they do. They need to do excellent research, publish in high impact factor journals, write and secure grants, initiate industry collaborations, teach, supervise students, lead the field, and much more. Yet it is rare for one person to have all the necessary skills (and time) to perform all these tasks.

Several talks proposed that research assessment shouldn’t focus on individual researchers, but on research teams (‘Team Science’). In this approach, team members get recognition for their diverse contributions to the success of the whole group.

The Team Science concept is also linked to another important aspect of research evaluation, which is leadership skills. In a traditional research career progression, academics who get to the top of their career ladder are those who are the most successful in doing research (traditionally measured in a number of publications in high impact factor venues). This does not always mean that those researchers had the leadership skills (or had the opportunity to develop them) that are necessary to build and sustain collaborative teams.

Rik Van de Walle, Rector of Ghent University in Belgium, emphasised this by demonstrating that in their new way of assessing academics, there will be a strong focus on the development of leadership skills, thereby helping sustain and embed good research.

“Darling, we need to talk”

There was a strong consensus about the necessity of continuous dialogue while revising the research assessment process. Researchers are the main stakeholders affected by any changes in the process, and therefore they need to be part of the discussions around changing the rewards system, rather than change being unilaterally decided by funders, management and HR services. To be part of the process, researchers need to understand why the changes are necessary and share the vision for change. As Eva Mendez summarised, if there is no vision, there is confusion. Researchers need to share this vision, as otherwise, they can indeed become confused and frustrated about attempts to change the system.

In addition, research assessment involves multiple stakeholders, and because of that, all these different stakeholders need to be involved and take actions in order for successful systemic changes to be implemented. Consultations and discussions with all these stakeholders are necessary to build consensus and shared an understanding of the problems. Otherwise, efforts to change the system will lead to distrust and frustration, as summarised by Noemie Aubert Bonn with her ‘integrity football’ analogy, where no one wishes to take the responsibility for the problem.

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“Integrity football” by Noemie Aubert Bonn. Source: https://eua.eu/component/attachments/attachments.html?task=attachment&id=2176

… while acting!

At the same time, Eva Mendez reminded us that just talking and waiting for someone else to do something else will also lead to disappointment. She thought that more stakeholders should act and start implementing changes in their own spheres of influence. She suggested that everyone should ask themselves the question “What CAN I do to… change the reward system?”. She provided some examples: PlanS as an important initiative by funding bodies, and the consequent pledges by individual researchers on their plans of PlanS adoption, or the FOS initiative – Full Open Science Research Group, which is designed for entire research groups wishing to commit to practising Open Science.

Conclusions – so what are we going to do?

All three of us who attended the event are working in research data support teams at university libraries. We are not directly involved in research evaluation and we are grateful to our libraries who allowed us to participate in this event to broaden our horizons and deepen our interests. That said, we reflected on Eva’s call for action and thought that besides writing a blog post, we could all contribute at least a little bit to a change in the system.

Here are our top resolutions:

  • Marta will work on better promotion and recognition of our Data Champions at TU Delft – researchers who volunteer their time to advocate good data management practices among their communities;
  • Alastair will lead the process of implementing an updated repository platform for 4TU.Center for Research Data, which will give researchers better credit and recognition for research data they publish;
  • Maria will kick off the Data Conversations series at VU Amsterdam, which will provide a forum for researchers to be recognised for the research data stories they share with others.

In addition, whenever we have a chance, we will keep reminding ourselves and our colleagues about the importance of rewarding quality, and not quantity, in research. An example of that was the VU Library LiveRethinking the Academic Reward System” talk show and podcast held at the VU Amsterdam on 14 March 2019, which revolved around the question of how to change the academic reward to facilitate research that is open and transparent and contributes to solving key societal issues.

Additional resources

Data Stewardship – goals for 2019

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Authors: Heather Andrews, Nicolas Dintzner, Alastair Dunning, Kees den Heijer, Santosh Ilamparuthi, Jeff Love, Esther Plomp, Marta Teperek, Yasemin Turkyilmaz-van der Velden, Yan Wang

From February 2019 onwards and with the appointment of the data steward at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EEMCS), the team of data stewards is complete: there is a dedicated data steward per every faculty in TU Delft. Therefore, the work in 2019 focuses on embedding the data stewards within their faculties, policy development, and also on making the project sustainable beyond the current funding allocation.

The document below outlines high-level plans for the data stewardship project in 2019.


Engagement with researchers

In 2019, the data stewards will (among others) apply the following new tactics to increase researchers’ engagement with research data management:

Meeting with all full professors

Inspired by the successful case study at the faculty of Aerospace Engineering, data stewards will aim to meet with all full professors at their respective faculties.

Development of training resources for PhD students and supervisors

Ensure that appropriate training recommendations and online data management resources are available for PhD students to help them comply with the requirements of the TU Delft Research Data Framework Policy. These should include:

  1. Appropriate resources for PhD students, e.g. support for data management plan preparation, and/or data management training for PhD students
  2. Support for PhD supervisors, e.g. data management guidance and data management plan checklists for PhD supervisors
  3. Online manuals/checklists for all researchers, e.g. information on TU Delft storage facilities, how to request a project drive, how to make data FAIR

Support for data management plans preparation

Ensure that researchers at the faculty are appropriately supported in writing of data management plans:

  1. At the proposal stage of projects, researchers are notified about available support for writing the data paragraph by the contract managers and/or project officers of their department
  2. All new grantees are contacted by the data stewards with an offer of data management and data management plan writing support
  3. Training resources on the use of DMPonline, which will be used by TU Delft for writing Data Management Plans, are available and known to faculty researchers

Coding Lunch & Data Crunch

Organise monthly 2h walk-in sessions for code and data management questions for faculty researchers. Researchers will be supported by all data stewards and the sessions will rotate between the 8 faculties.

The Electronic Lab Notebooks trial

Following up on the successful Electronic Lab Notebooks event in March 2018, a pilot is being set up to test Electronic Lab Notebooks at TU Delft in 2019. The data stewards from the faculties of 3mE and TNW are part of the Electronic Lab Notebooks working group and are in contact with interested researchers who will be invited to get involved in the pilot.

Data Champions

Further develop the data champions network at TU Delft:

  1. Ensure that every department at every faculty has at least one data champion
  2. Develop a community of faculty data champions by organising a meeting every two months on average
  3. Organise two joint events for all data champions at TU Delft and explore the possibility of organising an international event for data champions in collaboration with other universities

Faculty policies and workflows

In 2019, all faculties are expected to develop their own policies on research data management. However, successful implementation of these policies will depend on creating effective workflows for supporting researchers across the research lifecycle. Therefore, the following objectives are planned for 2019:

  1. Draft, consult on and publish faculty policies on research data management.
  2. Develop a strategy for faculty policy implementation
  3. Develop effective connections and workflows to support researchers throughout the research lifecycle (e.g. contacting every researcher who was successfully awarded a grant)

RDM survey

A survey on research data management needs was completed at 6 TU Delft Faculties (EWI, LR, CiTG, TPM, 3mE and TNW). In 2019, the following activities are planned:

  1. Publish the results of the survey conducted in the 6 faculties in a peer-reviewed journal
  2. Conduct the survey at BK and IDE  – first quarter of 2019
  3. Re-run the survey at EWI, LR, CiTG, TPM, 3mE and TNW – September 2019
  4. Compare the results of the survey in 2017/2018 with the results from 2019 of the re-run survey and publish faculty-specific reports with their key reflections on the Open Working blog
  5. Survey data visualisation in R or python
    The visualisation of 2017/2018 RDM survey results was available in Tableau, which is proprietary software. To adhere to the openness principle, and also to practice data carpentry skills (see below), the 2019 data visualisation will be conducted in R.

Training and professional development

On top of specific training on data management, in 2019 data stewards will invest in training in the following areas:

Software carpentry skills

Code management is now an integral part of research and is likely to become even more important in the coming years. Therefore, as a minimum, every data steward should complete the full software carpentry training as an attendee in order to be able to effectively communicate with researchers about their code management and sharing needs. In addition, data stewards are strongly encouraged to complete training for carpentry instructors to further develop their skills and capabilities.

Participation in disciplinary meetings

In order to keep up with the research fields they are supporting, data stewards will also participate in at least one meeting, specific to researchers from their discipline. Giving talks about data stewardship / open science during disciplinary meetings is strongly encouraged.

Events

In addition to dedicated events for the Data Champions, the following activities are planned for 2019:

In addition, the team is planning to organise the following events (no dates yet)

  • Software Carpentry workshops
    • March & November 2019 – at TU Delft
    • May 2019: at Eindhoven
    • October 2019: at Twente
  • Workshop on preserving social media data – workshop which will feature presentations from experts in the field of social media preservation, as well as investigative journalists (e.g. Bellingcat)
  • Conference on effectively collaborating with the industry (managing the tensions between open science and commercial collaborations)

Individual roles and responsibilities

Some data stewards have also undertaken additional roles and responsibilities:

  • Yasemin: Electronic Lab Notebooks, Data Champions
  • Esther: Electronic Lab Notebooks, DMP registry
  • Kees: Software Consultancy Lead

Sustainable funding for data stewardship

The current funding for the data stewardship project (salaries for the data stewards) comes from the University’s Executive Board and is until the end of 2020. However, the importance of the support offered to the research community by the data stewards has been already recognised not only by the academic community at TU Delft but also by support staff.

In order to ensure the continuation of the data stewardship programme and for TU Delft not to lose the highly skilled, trained and sought-after professionals, it is crucial that the source of sustainable funding is identified in 2019.

Data Stewardship at TU Delft – 2018 Report

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Authors: Marta Teperek, Yasemin Turkyilmaz-van der Velden, Shalini Kurapati, Esther Plomp,  Heather Andrews, Robbert Eggermont

TU Delft has been leading the way in fostering a good research data management culture to uphold the quality, transparency and reproducibility of research. Since 2017, TU Delft has piloted the Data Stewardship programme with the aim to provide disciplinary specific data management support to TU Delft researchers. The focus on disciplinary support is motivated by the belief that in research data management (RDM), there are no one-size-fits-all solutions.

TU Delft has eight faculties with a wide range of research topics. In order to provide dedicated disciplinary support to researchers, a Data Steward was appointed at every faculty. Each Data Steward has a PhD degree in research are relevant for the faculty.

This is a condensed 2018 annual report describing the progress, activities, achievements and future prospects of the project.


Team building and laying the groundwork for the programme

In 2017 the majority of work focused on the recruitment of Data Stewards at three faculties: Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Sciences (EEMCS), Aerospace Engineering (AE) and Civil Engineering and Geosciences (CEG), and laying the groundwork of the programme. In 2018 Data Stewards were appointed at the remaining faculties, which concluded the team building work and brought the programme to its full speed. Since the beginning of 2019, the team of Data Stewards is at its full capacity, with a dedicated Data Steward per faculty.

The Data Stewards meet weekly for training, information sessions, and knowledge and practice exchange. The weekly meetings focus on the RDM needs of TU Delft researchers and keeping up to date with the most recent trends in RDM such as the FAIR principles, General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) law, research and software reproducibility. Dedicated experts from TU Delft, as well as national and international scene are regularly invited to these meetings. Communication channels and information sharing spaces have been also created and are now effectively used by all team members. To increase the visibility of the programme and to openly share its progress, a Data Stewardship webpage and a dedicated section on Open Working blog were launched. While the Data Stewards are embedded at each faculty, the Research Data Services (RDS) team operate centrally at the TU Delft library. To establish strong links between these two teams, a joint Away Day is organised once a year. Additionally, members of the RDS team are also attending weekly Data Stewards meetings and participate in some of the joint projects and undertakings (e.g. roll out of a new data management plan template). In addition, connections with faculty secretaries were developed through dedicated meetings to talk about Data Stewardship hosted by the Library and attended by all faculty secretaries. All of these activities were overseen and coordinated by the Data Stewardship Coordinator who is located at the TU Delft library.

Day to day activities of the Data Stewards

The role of the Data Steward at TU Delft is relatively new, so one of the first tasks of the Data Stewards was to become visible to researchers and gather intelligence on the type of support and advice researchers require within the faculty. In the first couple of months, Data Stewards engaged with researchers during faculty meetings, interviews, graduate school seminars, open science roadshows and by sending out a survey on the data management needs (see below for more details).

After researchers were sufficiently aware of the help they could receive, Data Stewards started receiving questions and requests for data management support.  The requests varied across the 8 faculties, but there were a few common topics on which Data Stewards were regularly consulted, such as: advice on data management plans, information about data archiving options, data sharing possibility, GDPR concerns, cross-border data transfers, commercially sensitive data, or data licensing.

Data stewards are also the linking pin to the broader TU Delft research support ecosystem.  Pragmatically speaking, Data Stewards act as general practitioners to all data related questions and issues. If there is a need for a specific intervention from a university wide legal, ethics or ICT specialist, Data Stewards know where to direct the researcher to get the most specific and useful answers.

In addition to advice and consultation, Data Stewards provide and/or facilitate on-request training and workshops on data management topics for researchers and PhD students. Agreements are made with faculty graduate schools to allocate credit points for participation.

At the moment all the Data Stewards are involving in leading the RDM policy development at their respective faculties.

Data Champions

Although embedding Data Stewards at each faculty is a prerequisite for creating awareness and achieving cultural change in RDM, community building efforts are essential to fully accomplish these goals. Additionally, it is impossible for a single Data Steward to have all the necessary disciplinary background to understand and support all types of research carried out in one faculty. Therefore the Data Champions programme was launched in September 2018.

Data Champions are researchers who voluntarily act as local community-based advocates for good data management and sharing practices. In return, they are provided with opportunities to showcase their activities during meetings at the department, faculty and TU Delft level as well as (inter)national conferences to offer increased impact and visibility. Additionally, the Data Champions are offered travel grants to join meetings and conferences to showcase their Data Champion activities, and trainings and workshops to learn new RDM skills to share with their local community members.

Suitable candidates for the programme are identified by faculty Data Stewards and are encouraged to become Data Champions. The general communication with the Data Champions is carried out by the Data Steward at the Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering (3mE), who took on the role of the Data Champions Community Manager. The first meeting to officially kick off the programme was on 14 December 2018. This meeting took place in an informal setting to encourage interactive discussions, knowledge exchange and networking. Overall, it was very well received by the Data Champions as well as the research support professionals.  As of December 2018 we already had 27 Data Champions (at least one Data Champion per faculty) and this number is still growing. The AE Faculty, as well as the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management (TPM), already have at least one Data Champion at every department.

The Dean of the Faculty of Applied Sciences (AS) has recognised the importance of Data Champions for advocating for good data management and sharing practices and aims to also have at least one Data Champion per department. The AS faculty already has six Data Champions and two of them, Anton Akhmerov and Gary Steele, took the lead in creating a dedicated policy on Open Data for their department (Quantum Nanoscience). The importance of the Data Champions programme has been recognised also at a strategic level at TU Delft, evidenced by the wish of Prof. Rob Mudde, the Vice Rector Magnificus of TU Delft, to attend the next meeting of the Data Champions.

RDM Survey

To be able to offer dedicated RDM support, it is necessary to first define the problems and the needs of the researchers. Our survey on research data management needs, which was initiated in 2017 at three faculties (EEMCS, CEG and AE), has been extended and completed in three other faculties in 2018 (TPM, 3mE, AS). The survey gathered 680 responses in total and the data visualisation is publicly available. The survey provided important information on the state of data management practices at TU Delft. The survey will be repeated yearly and this way the results will serve as a benchmark to indicate the effects of the work of Data Stewards on data management awareness and practices at the faculties.

The joint presentation summarising survey results at LIBER conference in July 2018 by the Data Stewards from LT and 3mE faculties was very positively received by the community and downloaded 187 times. Based on this presentation, we got invited to submit a paper about the survey results to LIBER Quarterly. The survey will be run at the two remaining faculties (Architecture and the Built Environment – ABE, and Industrial Design Engineering – IDE) and re-run at the other faculties in 2019.

Data Stewardship in numbers

Summarising, in 2018 the Data Stewards have received at least 245 requests for help with data management (note that not all the requests are recorded, given that it involves manual copy-pasting of the requests received by emails). In addition, in 2018 Data Stewards conducted 68 dedicated interviews with researchers about their data management practices. Notably, the Data Steward at the AE Faculty has met with all the full professors at the faculty, which was positively received by TU Delft’s ex-Rector Magnificus Karel Luyben.

In addition, Data Stewards adhere to the principle “practice as you preach” and therefore share their work as openly as possible. In 2018 the team published 29 blog posts and other publications on the Open Working blog. Our top viewed blog post in 2018 is by the Data Steward at EEMCS, describing the results of the RDM survey (viewed 844 times).

Furthermore, the team have attended 46 national and international conferences and meetings in 2018, including 33 occasions were Data Stewards were presenting as invited speakers or keynote speakers. The Data Steward from the 3mE Faculty was awarded the competitive Research Data Alliance Early Career Researcher Grant to attend the International Data Week 2018 conference in Botswana in November 2018. Again, in adherence with the openness principles, all presentations are publicly shared in a dedicated Data Stewardship at TU Delft community in Zenodo.

Data Stewardship event

On 24 of May 2018 the team has organised a dedicated event “Engaging researchers with research data – Data Stewardship in practice” to showcase the work of Data Stewards at TU Delft and to exchange views and practices on Data Stewardship with other universities. The event was attended by over 120 individuals (with 35% of the participants  from countries other than the Netherlands). All participants judged the event as “good” or “excellent” and responses to open questions were overwhelmingly positive.

All the photos (taken by Jan van der Heul from the RDS team, our Chief Photographer), videos and presentations from the event are publicly available. In addition, three participants wrote blog posts with their reflections and take-home messages (Marjan Grootveld, Danny Kingsley and Martin Donnelly).

Projects

Data stewards have also been involved in many diverse projects. For example, the Data Stewards from the AE and CEG faculties took part in developing domain data protocols, which aim to provide researchers with disciplinary standards for data management in their research domains. The Data Stewards from the 3mE and AS faculties are part of the Electronic Lab Notebooks working group, which, following up on the successful Electronic Lab Notebooks event in March 2018, is now setting up a pilot to test Electronic Lab Notebooks at TU Delft in 2019.

Data stewards from the faculties of TPM, 3mE, AS and CEG have been involved in providing support for researchers working with software in order to improve code management practices and to make software more reproducible. Several workshops on software sustainability were organised, which resulted in a dedicated research paper that got accepted to be presented during the IEEE eScience 2018 conference and got published in the conference proceedings. The preprint of this paper is already downloaded 227 times.

These efforts eventually resulted in 4TU.Center for Research Data joining in December 2018 The Carpentries which is a non-profit organization teaching foundational coding, and data science skills to researchers worldwide. On 29 and 30 November, the first Software Carpentry workshop took place at TU Delft. The tickets got sold out just in a matter of days and we had around 30 researchers participating and another 45 on the waiting list, showing the huge interest and need for such training. Two more Carpentry workshops will take place in TU Delft in 2019. In addition, the Data Steward from the CEG faculty took the lead in the organisation of walk-in coding consultations for researchers wishing to get tailored support on their code management practices, which, due to its success and positive feedback from researchers, will continue to be organised on a regular basis. Moreover, a meeting with TU Delft researchers took place to discuss community building efforts for good programming practices. To this meeting, a representative from the Carpentries and a researcher from the University of Amsterdam was invited to learn lessons from their community building efforts.

Data Stewards have been also instrumental in driving forward the Open Science agenda. Dedicated Open Science roadshows (information sessions on research data management and on Open Access) have taken place at AE, TPM, IDE and CEG faculties. In addition, the TPM faculty organised a dedicated workshop on Open Science to their PhD students. The presentation “Open Science in a nutshell: what’s in it for me?” which was uploaded to Zenodo, has been downloaded 324 times and viewed 1,815 times.

In the current changing funding landscape where the researchers are expected to publish their papers and data openly, it is not feasible to evaluate researchers based on high impact journal publications alone for funding and promotion criteria. This is why, the TPM Faculty was also actively involved in discussions about academic rewards and how to make open science count in academic careers. Prof. Bartel Van De Walle was the keynote speaker at the event on Open Science skills which was co-organised by the Data Stewards, 4TU.Centre for Research Data and the EOSCPilot. There were two separate blog posts highlighting the key aspects of the event (one blog post about the event as a whole and another one about the interactive workshop).

Following the principle that good data management should start as early as possible, the Data Steward from the AE Faculty opiloted the use of Dataverse for keeping research data of master students. Valuable and curated datasets can be subsequently easily published with 4TU.Center for Research Data.

Recognising the need for disciplinary support and for community building, Data Stewards from the ABE and IDE faculties identified the need for Digital Humanities community at TU Delft and are currently discussing with researchers across TU Delft to scope their interests and needs. A bottom-up approach is taken to encourage researchers to take lead in forming their own communities and exchange research ideas, resources and challenges. The first community-driven meeting will take place in early January 2019 at ABE faculty.

Since 25 May 2018, GDPR has came into effect in Europe. In August, two events dedicated to GDPR and its implications for research data were co-organised by the Data Stewards and the Research Data Netherlands. An important aspect of these two events was that representatives from multiple institutions and countries were present to talk about their individual approaches and considerations.

Policy Development

On 26 June 2018, the TU Delft Research Data Framework Policy was approved by TU Delft’s Executive Board. The Framework Policy is an overarching policy on research data management for TU Delft as a whole and it defines the roles and responsibilities at the University level. In addition, the Framework provides templates for faculty-specific data management policies. It is important to develop the faculty policies according to discipline specific RDM needs of the researchers, so they can use this policy as a roadmap for good RDM practices.

Currently, the deans and the faculty management teams, together with the Data Stewards, are busy with the development of faculty-specific policies on data management which will define faculty-level responsibilities. Any interested researcher and research supporter will be invited to give feedback and therefore contribute to the development of the faculty policy. In AS and 3mE faculties, which have around 1000 researchers each, a single meeting would not be feasible, therefore the Data Stewards of these faculties will join to the meetings of every individual department to introduce the policy and ask for feedback. The Data Champions are particularly encouraged to get involved in the development of the policy in their faculties in order to fine tune the policy based on their disciplinary needs.

Future Prospects

As can be seen in this report, 2018 has been a very fruitful year for the TU Delft Data Stewardship programme and with a full team of Data Stewards from the beginning of 2019, we expect 2019 to be even more productive. The faculty policies are expected to be rolled-out and published 2019. As one of the requirements of the policy is all PhD candidates starting from 2019 to attend data management training, currently the Data Stewards are busy with the development of a dedicated training suitable for the disciplinary needs of the PhD candidates. For this, the Data Stewards are in close contact with the central and faculty graduate schools, PhD councils and colleagues from TU Delft Library.

We already have three events planned in 2019: a seminar titled as Limits of Reproducibility: Strategies for Transparent Qualitative Research which will be followed by a hands-on workshop about Managing Qualitative Data for Sharing and Transparency on 28 January, open science seminars kick off on 27 February and a seminar on publishing reproducible research on 16 May.

Additionally, we will also have a one-day event for all TU Delft’s Data Champions,
one workshop on working with software and High Performance Computing (HPC), a conference on collaboration with industry and open science and two more software carpentry workshops.

In addition, a dedicated blog post about out plans for 2019 is going to be published soon, so watch this space!

4TU.Centre for Research Data partners with The Carpentries: Impressions from the first workshop at TU Delft

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Written by Shalini Kurapati and Marta Teperek


Training needs: research computing skills for open science

In addition to good data management, software sustainability is important for open science.

In accordance with the survey conducted by the Software Sustainability Institute in 2014, 7 out of 10 researchers rely on code for their research. Sharing research data without the supporting code often makes research impossible to reproduce. Good documentation and version control have been highlighted as major contributors to sustainable software. In addition, earlier workshops and survey results indicated that researchers need training on good code writing and code management practices and version control.

Similarly, TU Delft-wide survey on data management needs revealed that 32% of researchers were interested in training on version control and 18% specifically in software carpentry workshops.

Thus, 4TU.Centre for Research Data made a strategic decision to partner with The Carpentries and became a Silver Member of the organisation.

What are The Carpentries?

The Carpentries “teach foundational coding, and data science skills to researchers worldwide.” That’s a community-based organisation, which maintains and develops curricula for three different types of workshops: software carpentry, data carpentry, and library carpentry. Detailed and structured lesson plans are available on GitHub and they are delivered by a network of carpentry instructors.

An important element of The Carpentries is that in order to deliver a workshop, instructors need to be certified. The certification process puts a particular emphasis on the pedagogical skills of the instructors.

First software carpentry at TU Delft

TU Delft hosted the first software carpentry workshop on 29 November 2018 as a pilot before officially joining The Carpentries. We had around 30 researchers participating (and another 45 on the waiting list!). The participants were from four faculties at TU Delft: Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Applied Sciences, Technology Policy & Management, and Architecture and Built Environment. We had three instructors and four helpers in the room.

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The GitHub pages with the lesson materials are publicly available and can be found here: https://mariekedirk.github.io/2018-11-29-Delft/ All participants were asked to bring their laptops along and to install some specific software. No prior programming knowledge was required. Collaborative notes were taken with Etherpad.

During the workshop, participants downloaded a prepared dataset and they worked with that dataset through the two days. They learnt task automation using Unix shell, version control using git, and python programming using jupyter notebooks.

Feedback

The Carpentries have a special way of organising feedback. Participants receive red and green post-it notes and use them to indicate problems / completion of tasks during the whole course. Similarly, after the end of each day, the participants are asked to indicate all the plus sides and negatives of the workshop on green and red post-it notes, respectively.

The feedback from the participants after the workshop helped us evaluate the training. The participants were overwhelmingly appreciative of the instructors and helpers and seem to have enjoyed the training. Some of the participants felt that the pace of the workshop was fast and they did not have time to experiment with the data set. Some others wished to get a more personal approach and to actually get an opportunity to work with their own disciplinary datasets.

Plans for the future

The waiting list for the workshop was very long and we had to disappoint more than 45 researchers who didn’t manage to get their spot on the day. In addition, faculty graduate schools have been willing to give course credits for PhD students who attend this workshop, which made the course even more attractive to attend for PhD students. Therefore, to meet the demand, we are planning to organise four more workshops in 2019: two workshops at TU Delft, one in Eindhoven and one in Twente. We will continue to monitor the number of interested researchers and if the need arises, we might consider scheduling some additional courses.

In addition, to increase our capacity in delivering carpentry training, some of the TU Delft’s data stewards and data champions will attend the training to become instructors. We hope to have this instructor training organised in April.

To address the feedback about the pace of the course, we will be more selective and include fewer exercises in our future workshops to ensure that the participants get the chance to experiment and play with their datasets and scripts.

In order to provide some more tailored support to researchers who have started to code but need some additional support to make it work, or who might have attended a carpentry workshop but are not sure how to apply the learning into practice, we will host dedicated coding walk-in hours consultations starting in January 2019.

So… watch out for the next carpentry workshop – scheduled for Spring 2019!

It’s time for open science skills to count in academic careers (Part 2: Workshop and Reflection)

Authors: Heather Andrews, Maria Cruz, Angus Whyte, Yasemin Turkyilmaz-van der Velden, Shalini Kurapati

To read Part 1 of the blog post follow this link.


 

Researchers at all levels should be equipped with skills relevant to open science and FAIR data, and the practice of these skills should be effectively rewarded and recognised. This much is clear and has been recently highlighted in the “Turning FAIR into reality” Report of the European Commission FAIR Data Expert Group. Indeed, that report states “there is an urgent need to develop skills in relation to FAIR data” and “metrics and indicators for research contributions need to be reconsidered and enriched to ensure they act as compelling incentives for Open Science and FAIR.”  

To change the academic rewards system, it is necessary to define and agree upon the skills researchers need to have at different stages of their careers. This was the goal of the workshop “It’s time for open science skills to count in academic careers” held at TU Delft on 26 September 2018. This post forms the second part of the report of the the workshop. Here we present the outcomes of workshop, based on the interactive group work described below. The results of this work will be applied in EOSCpilot, which is laying the groundwork for skills development in the European Commission’s European Open Science Cloud.

Overview of the hands-on workshop

The participants were divided into four groups. Each group focused on a specific career level according to the European Commission’s framework for research careers:

  1. R1: First Stage Researcher (up to the point of PhD)
  2. R2: Recognized Researcher (PhD holders or equivalent who are not yet fully independent)
  3. R3: Established Researcher (researchers who have developed a level of independence.)
  4. R4: Researchers – Leading Researcher (researchers leading their research area or field)

The above mentioned groups were led by Yasemin Turkyilmaz, Ellen Verbakel, Maria Cruz and Alastair Dunning, respectively. The registered participants of the one day event included researchers from all career levels, librarians, data stewards, and policymakers. However R4 researchers were unavailable for the hands-on workshop.

Each group received a  list of nine pre-defined open science skills together with a detailed explanation for each skill. The group activity for each of the groups was divided into two parts. In the first part, the groups were asked  to shortlist a maximum of 4 skills most relevant to their respective career level (R1-R4). Subsequently, for each skill, they wrote  down on post-it notes: 1. Why is this skill relevant to researchers at this career level? 2. What would be the evidence that researchers at this career level have these skills and can apply it in practice? (in other words: what does a person applying the skill do?) 3. What support (from support staff, service providers) will researchers need  to apply this skill?

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After displaying their ideas on whiteboards, the groups were given 5 minutes each to present a summary of their main findings to the other groups. This was followed by a short discussion followed with questions from all the groups. Below is the summary of the findings of each of the four groups.

R1 group activity summary:

The group focused on early career researchers. This group of researchers is dependant on the researchers at higher positions in the academic ladder. At the same time, often this group of researchers is perceived as being the ‘bold’ ones able to take initiatives and amenable to change. It was also recognised that R1 researchers can benefit greatly from more training and more information on open science possibilities. The four skills shortlisted by this group were:

1) Adherence to the FAIR data and code principles during and after research. The group added the term ‘code’ to this skill as well. The group reasoned that the FAIR principles represent what is necessary to have sustainable sharing and archiving of both data and code, which is important for verifiability of research. The group recognised that in order to adhere to the FAIR principles, early career researchers have to receive training as an inherent part of the curriculum. They also stressed that good supervision and getting good examples would facilitate this skill.

2) Securing funding for open science/support. The group reasoned that receiving specific training on awareness of  funding opportunities for Open Science (e.g. funding for Open Access publishing) as well as preparation to secure such grants would support early career researchers to be  more independent from their respective supervisors and practise open science more freely. They proposed that this could be achieved in collaboration with grant support offices and graduate schools.

3) Awareness and adherence to relevant ethical and legal policies. This skill was found to be important to overcome fear and uncertainties about ethical and legal requirements. This can make early career researchers more confident when discussing with senior colleagues  the parameters these requirements set around sharing their research outputs. The group proposed Q&A catalogues which could help early career researchers better understand complex terms such as codes of conduct, legal terms, informed consent etc.

4) Recognizing and acknowledging the contribution of others. The group found it important for early career researchers to know how to properly cite data, code and methods; and how to  acknowledge collaborators, technicians in the lab, etc. The group argued that if people are properly acknowledged, then they are more willing to contribute again, which is a great source of motivation for early career researchers. They expect University and Faculty policies and training to be instrumental for this skill. These should also promote the standards for using persistent identifiers, and the CRediT taxonomy for acknowledging who has contributed what to a publication.

                                                              

R2 group activity summary

This group saw R2 researchers as typically those at the postdoctoral level. The group thought that postdocs were seen as researchers who are not in charge of funding nor leading projects like type 3 and type 4 researchers. Postdocs were seen as researchers focused on making effective collaborations,  and working on building up their reputation. The four skills proposed were:

1) Recognising and acknowledging the contribution of others. Recognition was perceived as the main driver for postdoctoral researchers, as well as for researchers working with postdocs. The group thought that researchers need a policy framework that enforces proper recognition and receive training on how to get recognition (e.g. setting up and using ORCID).

2) Making use of open data from others. The group considered this skill as important for verifiability, and as an effective way to start collaborations with other researchers. However, to put this skill into practice, researchers need to know how to search for datasets and assess their quality. Support staff should define the standards for high quality open data, provide support in data curation and give training to researchers on best open data practices.

3) Adherence to good code management practices. This skill was also considered important for verifiability purposes and to stimulate others to reuse the code. It is seen as a quality stamp for the respective code creator, which improves the researcher’s reputation. In order to get this skill, researchers would benefit from training on version control and on writing proper code documentation. It was also suggested that researchers could learn more about these matters from research software engineers.

4) Using or developing research tools open for reuse by others. The group felt that standardisation is crucial to enable effective collaborations. Thus, researchers should receive training on the use of platforms such as github and training on metadata standards.

R3 group activity summary

This group proposed 3 skills, unlike the other groups that considered the maximum number of 4 skills (proposed by the workshop organizing committee). Largely because it was felt that the skill ‘being a role model in practicing open science’ would by definition cover most of the practical skills on the list. The group considered this to be the most important skill for R3 researchers.  These researchers are already established in their careers and their fields (already developing and leading some projects), but are still very much involved in the day-to-day practice of research (e.g. they still acquire data or write software). As such, they can lead by example and influence not only earlier career researchers, particularly those they directly supervise, but also more senior colleagues. R3 researchers are very aware of the obstacles which researchers encounter when trying to change how research groups work. The proposed skills were the following:

1)  Being a role model in practising open science. Stage 3 researchers were seen as researchers who are still very active in research, and but who also have a close relation with senior colleagues, the researchers in higher positions. This gives them the opportunity to establish how researchers are evaluated within their team. Stage 3 researchers have an influential role within their team, e.g. in the hiring and promotion decisions within the team. In order to do this, it was acknowledged that stage 3 researchers need support from the R4 researchers. This was a key point of discussion, because even though stage 3 researchers are seen as big influencers in the academic ladder, they still depend on the stage 4 researchers and funding committees. In relation to this skill, it was also felt that R3 researchers should not only lead by example in the way they practice open science, but should also directly influence others by speaking about it. In short, practice what they preach, and preach what they practice.

2) Securing funding for open science/support. Stage 3 researchers are involved in hiring people and applying for funding. When applying for funding for example, they should be explicit about how open science will be carried out throughout the project. When hiring, they should include open science requirements in the hiring criteria. The group also recognised that for this to happen effectively, funders need to be willing to provide funding to pay for the costs of open science activities associated with projects, and research grant offices need to advise researchers on how to include these costs in their grant applications.

3) Recognizing and acknowledging the contribution of others. The group felt this is an important area where R3 researchers can lead by example. In addition, R3 researchers are usually still building up a network and collaborations, and to do this effectively, recognition is always necessary.

R4 group activity summary

The group considered project leaders as researchers who are usually less involved in the day-to-day research practices of research. As project leaders they may be in charge of project management and involved in designing research projects, policies and regulations, vision and strategy.  Nevertheless, it was acknowledged that researchers at this senior career stage still needed substantial support from their institution in order to put their vision into practice. Having this in mind, the group shortlisted the following skills:


1) Being a role model in practising open science. As project leaders, stage 4 researchers can influence a broader community (not only the researchers in their project, but also funding committees, other project leaders, executive boards, etc.). They can promote change in daily practices, but also in research policies. Stage 4 researchers could become open science role models by promoting and discussing it  with their network. Advocating for open science during meetings and conferences; participating in policy development, and changing the practices within their respective groups. In order to do this, they need platforms and tools at their institutions, they also need recognition for advocating for open science, and they need support from their team members.

2) Recognising and acknowledging the contribution of others. Just like in the other groups, this group found it relevant for researchers to recognise everyone’s contribution in a project; recognising not only the scientific staff but also the support staff (laboratory technicians, data managers, etc.). In order to do it, the careers of the support staff should also be recognised for example, by creating new job profiles for data managers, data stewards, etc.

3) Developing a vision and strategy on how to integrate OS practices in the normal practice of doing research. This skill was found to help create the link between principles and actual practice. Stage 4 researchers usually work on the ‘big pictures’ of research, and thus, they have to have a vision and strategy to steer their research and project members. In doing so, they should have the advice of support staff, to ensure the feasibility of their vision. They should also have clear information about who does/can-do what within their institution, and about financial possibilities for them to turn their vision into reality.

4) Awareness and adherence to relevant ethical and legal policies. This skill was seen as relevant because senior researchers are accountable for their project team’s behaviour. Any risk of ethical and/or legal infringement will jeopardise the reputation not only of the project leader, but also of their entire group and, quite likely, the institution they belong to. Thus, it is important for stage 4 researchers to establish procedures dealing with ethical and legal issues. In order to properly do this, the institution should provide researchers with integrated support. The role of each support staff member should be well-defined (and well-informed to the researcher), there should be effective communication within the support staff, and the workflows through which the researchers can receive support need to be clearly stated.

Overall workshop summary

Overall, all groups stressed the importance of peer to peer learning: everyone can contribute to changing cultures and daily practices. All groups also agreed that proper infrastructure and policy support from institutions is required for researchers to truly implement open science practices.

Finally, recognition was seen as one of  the main drivers for both scientific and non-scientific staff participating in a research project and all groups stressed the importance of proper recognition of open science practices.

Next steps

The ideas and discussion generated during the workshop have given us a rich corpus of information to reflect on the workshop objectives and to envision a road map for the future to implement these ideas and discussions. The workshop outputs will be applied in EOSCpilot to help focus its Skills Framework on the key skills identified, the rationale for these, and the mapping of skills to researcher career stages together with the support requirements.  Watch this space for progress and updates.

And finally a motto for everyone: change is in your hands! Everyone can contribute to change of practice in their own spheres of influence.

Additional resources

  • Part 1 of the the blog post can be viewed here.
  • All presentations of the speakers can be viewed and downloaded here.

It’s time for open science skills to count in academic careers (Part 1: Talks)

Authors: Shalini Kurapati, Marta Teperek, Maria Cruz, Angus Whyte

Disclaimer: In the spirit of openness and transparency, we would like to share that Shalini Kurapati wrote parts of this blog post based on the zenodo record of the presentations even though she wasn’t present during the event. Her account was verified by the remaining authors who were present.

To read Part 2 of this blog post follow this link.


 

Open Science is not always easy – skills are urgently needed

Open science is becoming a ubiquitous and recurring theme in the current academic environment. Researchers are increasingly expected to publicly share their research outputs (data, code, models etc.) as well as their publications. This often requires considerable effort from researchers to manage and curate their research outputs to make them shareable. But are these efforts appropriately rewarded? Emphasising the number of publications in high impact factor journals as the only valuable metric for academic promotion and hiring won’t motivate researchers to practise open science.

There is a lot of interest in changing the reward system to better align it with the actions researchers are expected to take towards more open research practices, for instance, the OSPP Rewards WG. Making sure that researchers have the right skills to do that is the other side of that coin. To change the rewards system, we have to understand and identify the skills researchers should be rewarded, and recognise that these may change at different stages of their academic careers. This was precisely the goal of the workshop on 26 September 2018 that we organised at TU Delft jointly with the EOSCpilot. The EOSCpilot project is laying the groundwork for the European Open Science Cloud, and wants to offer a framework for institutions and others to develop the skills needed for researchers, data stewards, and others who support research to help put open science into practice.

The workshop was aptly titled “It’s time for open science skills to count in academic careers” (#openskills18). The workshop format combined presentations on related topics with interactive group work in the afternoon. In this post, we summarise the presentations and in a separate blog post we’ll present the outcomes of the workshop and will reflect on the key findings /thoughts on future steps.

The  aim and format of the workshop  was presented by Valentino Cavalli of LIBER and EOSCPilot. In his welcome note, Mr.Cavalli explained barriers to open science in the European and wider academic context. These barriers include a culture of disincentives, fragmentation between infrastructures, interoperability issues and access to computational resources. He highlighted that the workshop would focus on the culture of disincentives, which has to be changed such that researchers at all careers levels are equipped with relevant skills and suitably rewarded for putting them into practice

Opening talks

The opening talks were delivered by Ms. Anne de Vries (PhD students Network Netherlands), Prof. Bartel Van de Walle (TU Delft) and Mr. Rinze Benedictus (UMC Utrecht).

Ms. Anne de Vries shared the perspectives of the eurodoc, the European council of doctoral candidates and junior researchers on open science policy and practices. She stated that it is important to identify and train open science skills for early career researchers based on their disciplines. Early career researchers should also be made aware on how to make their outputs FAIR and how open science skills will not only take science forward but also positively influence their careers. She also reflected that senior staff should support early career researchers in practising open science and thus also need appropriate education and training.

Prof. Bartel van de Walle spoke on the open science policies and practical examples from his domain of information management during humanitarian crisis response.  He also presented the challenges of implementing open science due to the inertia in research institutions that are often resistant to change. He insisted that open science is not just a requirement of funding agencies but is the right way forward to democratise science and achieve the UN’s sustainable development goals. He also pointed out the waves of change and indicated an example of successful implementation of open science policies in practices like McGill University’s Neurological institute and hospital. He concluded his speech by saying that open science is just science done right.

Mr. Rinze Benedictus delivered a powerful message with his talk: institutions should not equate the impact of a research work to an impact factor of a journal. He displayed the reinforcing loop of how authorship in high impact journals is an incentive for researchers for receiving more funding and recognition and to continue with the cycle of publishing to increase citation scores. He showed the damning evidence from The Lancet and Nature about the reproducibility crisis in science due to the earlier said focus on publishing to establish scholarship. While referring to global initiatives such as the DORA to change  attitudes among institutions and individual researchers, he gave a concrete example of how UMC Utrecht is implementing good practices in rewarding researchers. For instance, at evaluation meetings at UMC, a researcher would be asked “How did you arrive at your research question and what are your next steps”? Rather than the traditional “what is your measurable output”.

Dr. Simon Kerridge (CASRAI) gave a talk on the CreDIT taxonomy. The problem that CreDIT tries to solve is that the current authorship criteria in publication doesn’t give sufficient recognition for various contributions of researchers. In addition, authorship credit alone doesn’t support accountability for the research results. He stated that since science is increasingly a team effort, credit needs to be given where due to incentivise researchers for their unique contribution. He explained that the CreDiT taxonomy aims to offer a role based credit systems, where the contributors can assign themselves credit for 14 tasks: writing, supervision, review, data analysis, project management and so on. Finally, he presented the vision for the future of increasing the awareness of the CreDiT taxonomy and to create feedback mechanism to evaluate future versions and to link it platforms like ORCID and Crossref.

Closing remarks

The closing remarks of the workshop were provided by Ms. Anette Björnsson (European Commission) and by Mr. Kevin Ashley (Digital Curation Center & EOSCPilot).

Ms. Anette Björnsson reflected on the current initiatives within the European Commission towards changing academic rewards. She highlighted the importance of several recent reports produced by EC Working Groups: Evaluation of Research Careers fully acknowledging Open Science Practices, the report on Next Generation Metrics and Turning FAIR Data into reality. All of them influence the current thinking at the European Commission and also help shape the mission and vision of the European Open Science Cloud. She also stressed that large collaborative efforts at the European level require cooperation and consensus between all EU Member States, which often require time and patience. The situation is no different when it comes to the implementation of policies and changing practices in open science: individual Member States are at different stages of implementation and have varying levels of infrastructure and personnel currently available to them. However, Ms.Björnsson ensured us that while sometimes slower than desired, change is coming. Given that EOSC is a collaborative, pan-European endeavour, the chances are that changes brought with the EOSC will also be more effective and sustainable long-term.

Mr. Kevin Ashley then continued reflecting on the discussions which took place throughout the day, and in particular, the points raised by researchers during the interactive workshop part. He stressed that the common priority to all researchers, regardless of their career stages seems to be to get the recognition they deserve for Open Science activities. He reflected that there are (numerous) barriers to practical implementation of Open Science and to rewarding those practising Open Science appropriately, but that these barriers should not stop anyone from changing the status quo. As Dr. Maria Cruz beautifully summarised in her tweet, based on Mr. Ashley’s words: It’s possible to change the academic rewards system. It’s possible for PhD students. It’s possible for senior researchers. And it’s possible for institutions.

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The format, content and outcomes of the hands-on workshop during the event, together with some reflections and thoughts on next steps are published in a separate blog post

Additional resources

  • All presentations of the speakers can be viewed and downloaded here.