Category: Planning

Data Stewardship – goals for 2019

bulletin-board-3127287_1280.jpg

Authors: Heather Andrews, Nicolas Dintzner, Alastair Dunning, Kees den Heijer, Santosh Ilamparuthi, Jeff Love, Esther Plomp, Marta Teperek, Yasemin Turkyilmaz-van der Velden, Yan Wang

From February 2019 onwards and with the appointment of the data steward at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EEMCS), the team of data stewards is complete: there is a dedicated data steward per every faculty in TU Delft. Therefore, the work in 2019 focuses on embedding the data stewards within their faculties, policy development, and also on making the project sustainable beyond the current funding allocation.

The document below outlines high-level plans for the data stewardship project in 2019.


Engagement with researchers

In 2019, the data stewards will (among others) apply the following new tactics to increase researchers’ engagement with research data management:

Meeting with all full professors

Inspired by the successful case study at the faculty of Aerospace Engineering, data stewards will aim to meet with all full professors at their respective faculties.

Development of training resources for PhD students and supervisors

Ensure that appropriate training recommendations and online data management resources are available for PhD students to help them comply with the requirements of the TU Delft Research Data Framework Policy. These should include:

  1. Appropriate resources for PhD students, e.g. support for data management plan preparation, and/or data management training for PhD students
  2. Support for PhD supervisors, e.g. data management guidance and data management plan checklists for PhD supervisors
  3. Online manuals/checklists for all researchers, e.g. information on TU Delft storage facilities, how to request a project drive, how to make data FAIR

Support for data management plans preparation

Ensure that researchers at the faculty are appropriately supported in writing of data management plans:

  1. At the proposal stage of projects, researchers are notified about available support for writing the data paragraph by the contract managers and/or project officers of their department
  2. All new grantees are contacted by the data stewards with an offer of data management and data management plan writing support
  3. Training resources on the use of DMPonline, which will be used by TU Delft for writing Data Management Plans, are available and known to faculty researchers

Coding Lunch & Data Crunch

Organise monthly 2h walk-in sessions for code and data management questions for faculty researchers. Researchers will be supported by all data stewards and the sessions will rotate between the 8 faculties.

The Electronic Lab Notebooks trial

Following up on the successful Electronic Lab Notebooks event in March 2018, a pilot is being set up to test Electronic Lab Notebooks at TU Delft in 2019. The data stewards from the faculties of 3mE and TNW are part of the Electronic Lab Notebooks working group and are in contact with interested researchers who will be invited to get involved in the pilot.

Data Champions

Further develop the data champions network at TU Delft:

  1. Ensure that every department at every faculty has at least one data champion
  2. Develop a community of faculty data champions by organising a meeting every two months on average
  3. Organise two joint events for all data champions at TU Delft and explore the possibility of organising an international event for data champions in collaboration with other universities

Faculty policies and workflows

In 2019, all faculties are expected to develop their own policies on research data management. However, successful implementation of these policies will depend on creating effective workflows for supporting researchers across the research lifecycle. Therefore, the following objectives are planned for 2019:

  1. Draft, consult on and publish faculty policies on research data management.
  2. Develop a strategy for faculty policy implementation
  3. Develop effective connections and workflows to support researchers throughout the research lifecycle (e.g. contacting every researcher who was successfully awarded a grant)

RDM survey

A survey on research data management needs was completed at 6 TU Delft Faculties (EWI, LR, CiTG, TPM, 3mE and TNW). In 2019, the following activities are planned:

  1. Publish the results of the survey conducted in the 6 faculties in a peer-reviewed journal
  2. Conduct the survey at BK and IDE  – first quarter of 2019
  3. Re-run the survey at EWI, LR, CiTG, TPM, 3mE and TNW – September 2019
  4. Compare the results of the survey in 2017/2018 with the results from 2019 of the re-run survey and publish faculty-specific reports with their key reflections on the Open Working blog
  5. Survey data visualisation in R or python
    The visualisation of 2017/2018 RDM survey results was available in Tableau, which is proprietary software. To adhere to the openness principle, and also to practice data carpentry skills (see below), the 2019 data visualisation will be conducted in R.

Training and professional development

On top of specific training on data management, in 2019 data stewards will invest in training in the following areas:

Software carpentry skills

Code management is now an integral part of research and is likely to become even more important in the coming years. Therefore, as a minimum, every data steward should complete the full software carpentry training as an attendee in order to be able to effectively communicate with researchers about their code management and sharing needs. In addition, data stewards are strongly encouraged to complete training for carpentry instructors to further develop their skills and capabilities.

Participation in disciplinary meetings

In order to keep up with the research fields they are supporting, data stewards will also participate in at least one meeting, specific to researchers from their discipline. Giving talks about data stewardship / open science during disciplinary meetings is strongly encouraged.

Events

In addition to dedicated events for the Data Champions, the following activities are planned for 2019:

In addition, the team is planning to organise the following events (no dates yet)

  • Software Carpentry workshops
    • March & November 2019 – at TU Delft
    • May 2019: at Eindhoven
    • October 2019: at Twente
  • Workshop on preserving social media data – workshop which will feature presentations from experts in the field of social media preservation, as well as investigative journalists (e.g. Bellingcat)
  • Conference on effectively collaborating with the industry (managing the tensions between open science and commercial collaborations)

Individual roles and responsibilities

Some data stewards have also undertaken additional roles and responsibilities:

  • Yasemin: Electronic Lab Notebooks, Data Champions
  • Esther: Electronic Lab Notebooks, DMP registry
  • Kees: Software Consultancy Lead

Sustainable funding for data stewardship

The current funding for the data stewardship project (salaries for the data stewards) comes from the University’s Executive Board and is until the end of 2020. However, the importance of the support offered to the research community by the data stewards has been already recognised not only by the academic community at TU Delft but also by support staff.

In order to ensure the continuation of the data stewardship programme and for TU Delft not to lose the highly skilled, trained and sought-after professionals, it is crucial that the source of sustainable funding is identified in 2019.

Why is this a good Data Management Plan?

pencil-1891732_960_720

This blog post reports from a workshop session led by Marjan Grootveld and Ellen Leenarts from DANS. The workshop was part of a larger event “Towards cultural change in data management – data stewardship in practice” organised by TU Delft Library on 24th of May 2018.

This blog post was written by Marjan Grootveld from DANS it was published before on the OpenAIRE blog.


It’s not just colonel Hannibal Smith, who loves it when a plan comes together. Don’t we all? On a more serious note, this also holds for Data Management Plans or DMPs. In a DMP a researcher or research team describes what data goes into a project (reuse) and comes out of it (potential reuse), How the team takes care of the data, and Who is allowed to do What with the data When.

Just like a project plan a DMP undergoes a reviewing process. Often, however, researchers share their draft version and questions with research support staff and data stewards (see the results of this survey by OpenAIRE and the FAIR Data Expert Group). About twenty data stewards shared their review and pre-view experiences in a lively session at the Technical University Delft on May 24th. During the day the organisers and speakers highlighted various aspects of data stewardship with a welcome focus on practice situations, especially in the break-out sessions. (When the presentations are available we will add a link to this blog post.)

In the session called “Why is this a good Data Management Plan?” Marjan Grootveld (DANS, OpenAIRE) and Ellen Leenarts (DANS, EOSC-hub) presented text samples taken from DMPs. By raising their hands – or not! – and subsequent discussion the participants gave their view on the quality of the sample DMP texts. For instance, the majority gave a thumbs-up for “A brief description of each dataset is provided in table 2, including the data source, file formats and estimated volume to plan for storage and sharing”. In contrast, the quote “Both the collected and the generated data, anonymised or fictional, are not envisioned to be made openly accessible.” drew a good laugh and the thumbs went down. Similarly, the information that the length of time for which the data will remain re-usable “may vary for the type of data and <is> difficult to specify at this stage of the project” was found not acceptable; the plan should a least explain why it is difficult, and how and when the project team nevertheless will provide a specific answer. And is it really more difficult than for other projects, whose DMPs do provide this information?

Although it can be hard to be specific in the first version of a DMP, it’s essential to demonstrate that you know what Data Management is about, and that you will deliver FAIR and maximally Open data. Does the DMP, for instance, tell what kind of metadata and documentation will be shared to provide the necessary context for others to interpret the data correctly? Does it distinguish between storing the data during the project and sustainably archiving them afterwards? (Yes, we had a sample text neatly describing the file formats during the data processing stage versus the file formats for sharing and preservation.)

There was consensus in the group on the quality of most of the quotes. Where opinions differed, this had mainly to do with the fact that the quotes were brief and therefore open to more lenient or more picky interpretation. In other cases, a sample text had both positive and negative aspects. For instance, “The source code will be released under an open source licensing scheme, whenever IPR of the partners is not infringed.” was found rather hedging (“whenever”) and unspecific (which licensing scheme?), but the plan to make also source code available is good; too often this seems to be forgotten, when the notion of “data” is understood in a limited way.

The session participants agreed that a plan with many phrases like “where suitable/ where appropriate/ should/ possibly” is too vague and doesn’t inspire much trust. On the other hand, information on who is responsible for particular data management activities is valuable, and so is planning like “The work package leaders will evaluate and update the DMP at least in months 12, 24 and 36”. Reviewers prefer explicit information and commitment to good intentions – which may be something to keep in mind for your “Open A-Team“.

 

Training for Data Stewards

As discussed in our previous blog post, TU Delft embarked on an ambitious Data Stewardship programme. The programme aims to address disciplinary needs in Research Data Management by appointing a dedicated subject-specific Data Steward at each one of TU Delft’s eight Faculties. Three Faculties have already appointed their Data Stewards.

Data Stewards are subject-specific experts and therefore bring different skills and knowledge to the team. However, this also means that Stewards might have different degrees of understanding about the overall trends and expectations in the field of research data management and Open Science. Therefore, in order to ensure that all Stewards deliver consistent messages and good quality support to the research community, an intense training programme was developed.

External training

In the first instance, all Data Stewards will attend and complete the intense Essentials 4 Data Support, delivered to international communities by the Research Data Netherlands. The main goal of the course is “teaching the basic knowledge and skills (essentials) to enable a data supporter to take the first steps towards supporting researchers in storing, managing, archiving and sharing their research data”.

Internal training

In addition to external training, Data Stewards will also attend a series of two-hour in-house training sessions, delivered by local experts in data management:

  • Introduction to delivering data management workshops
  • Awareness about local support for data archiving:
    • 4TU.Centre for Research Data – why to use it and how to use it?
    • Data Funds – available for researchers to prepare data for deposit
  • Open Access services available at the Library
  • Supporting researchers with Data Management Plans
  • ICT support for data management at TU Delft
  • Selfish benefits of data sharing
  • Presentation skills

Training is scheduled to complete by end of December 2017. Data Stewards will develop and start delivering training for their local research communities from January 2018.

If you have any comments or would like to make suggestions about this training programme, please add your comment below or contact datastewards@tudelft.nl – we would be delighted to hear from you.

Data Stewardship – August 2017 Update

Where is the project at and what is the next milestone?

As of the end of August 2017, four key staff members were appointed for the project:

  • Three dedicated, subject-specific Data Stewards:
    • Jasper van Dijck, Munire van der Kruyk and Robbert Eggermont (joint appointment) at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science
    • Kees den Heijer at the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences
    • Heather Andrews at the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering
  • Data Stewardship Coordinator:
    • Marta Teperek, based at TU Delft Library

The next key milestone is to appoint the remaining five Data Stewards. The process will be initiated in September 2017 with the aim of appointing Data Stewards in early 2018.